Michigan Non-Gaming Tribal Economic Impact Study

Media Resources

Michigan Non-Gaming Tribal
Economic Impact Study

Media Release

The economic development activity of non-gaming tribal business entities (TBEs) within Michigan has a tremendous impact on tribal and regional economies, as well as the overall economy in Michigan.

The purpose of the Michigan Non-Gaming Tribal Economic Impact Study (2019) is to quantify and provide empirical data from which to discuss the benefits of TBEs in Michigan. Specifically, it analyzes jobs, business development and retention, expansion/development investments, and how and in what way TBEs impact overall economic development.

We trust that this study will help guide the planning and coordination among tribes and policymakers at the local, state, and federal level. Our hope is that this planning and coordination will support the tribes’ efforts to attract and deploy resources in tribal communities and in communities throughout Michigan. It would behoove us all, as residents of this great state, to understand the impacts created by these TBEs, not just for the tribal communities, but for the broader communities in which they operate.

Currently, all 12 federally recognized tribes of Michigan have some degree of non-gaming economic activity. Many studies refer only to specific tribal gaming businesses since they produce an abundance of economic activity. However, this study focuses on non-gaming business activities and isolates economic activity, removing gaming and tribal government financial flows.

The study was coordinated by the CEO of Waséyabek Development Company, LLC, a 100% tribally-owned economic development company of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi Indians and partially funded through a generous grant from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC). Thirty-eight non-gaming business entities, owned and managed by nine federally-recognized tribes in Michigan, chose to participate in the study, and data from these tribes was collected and analyzed by Eric S. Trevan, Ph.D., and Jon Deacon Panamaroff, MPA.

The outputs are summarized to protect the confidentiality of the tribal business entities.

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