Year(s)

Event(s)

0796

Westward Migration of Anishinabe | Formation of the Council of Three Fires

~1441

The Council of Three Fires Split into Separate Groups | Potwatomi Migrate South to Lower Michigan

1634

First Recorded Encounter with Europeans

1640 - 1701

Beaver Wars (French and Iroquois Wars) Force Relocation to Door County, Wisconsin

1687

Great Lakes Algonquin and French Drive Iroquois Back to New York | Potawatomi Migration Back to Michigan

~1712

Bands of Potawatomi Settle at Fort Pontchartrain on Detroit River

1763

Detroit Potawatomi Leave Detroit and Migrate South and West

1765

Detroit Potawatomi Establish Village on Huron River | Become Known as Potawatomi of the Huron

1774

Potawatomi of the Huron Establish Another Village on the Salt Fork of the River Raisin | Village Called “Naudewine Sippy” or “Waudagon Sippy” (variants of “Nottawasepi) | They Also Set Up Villages on the Grand River Near Modern Day Eaton Rapids

1795

Treaty of Greenville | First Recognition as Sovereign Entity

1807

Treaty of Detroit | Eight Million Acres Ceded to U.S. Government for 1.2 Cents per Acre

1821

Treaty of Chicago | Nottawaseppi Reservation Established

1827

Treaty of St. Joseph | Nottawaseppi Reservation Enlarged

1830

The Indian Removal Act

1833

Treaty of Chicago | Nottawaseppi Reservation Extinguished

1838

Potawatomi "Trail of Death" | Neighboring Non-Pokagon Potawatomi Forced to Relocate to Kansas

1839

John Moguago Becomes Chief

1840

Huron Potawatomi Forced to Relocate to Kansas

1842

Huron Potawatomi Return to the Nottawasippe Prairie

1845

Purchase of Pine Creek Reservation (June 10th, 1845)

1845 - 1850

Methodist Missionary Activity | Impact on the Pine Creek Settlement

1863 - 1864

Death of Chief John Moguago | Phineas Pamptopee Becomes Chief

1889

Annuity Commutation | Establishment of East Indiantown

1900

Population at the Pine Creek Reservation Begins to Increase (Through 1930) Gradually

1904

Creation of Taggart Roll

1904 - 1918

Decline of East Indiantown

1914

Stephen Pamptopee Becomes Chief

1923

Rise of New Indiantown

1926

Samuel Mandoka Becomes Chief

1929 - 1939

Great Depression Begins | Many Residents Move Away from Pine Creek Reservation

1934

Death of Last Traditional Chief (Samual Mandoka)

1934

Indian Reorganization Act Signed; Leader of the Pine Creek Reservation (also referred to as "Indiantown"), Austin Mandoka, Receives Correspondence Confirming Huron Potawatomi are Eligible for Benefits of Indian Reorganization

1934

Leadership by Committee Begins

1939

Federal Government Ends IRA Reorganization Efforts in Lower Michigan | First Denial of Federal Reaffirmation

1939 - 1945

World War 2 | Indiantown Population Doubles

1950s

Pattern of Work Off the Pine Creek Reservation Grows

1960s

Tribal Members Living on Pine Creek Reservation Dwindles

1970

Formation of Huron Potawatomi, Inc. | Development of Modern Political Organization

1972

Second Attempt at Federal Reaffirmation | Difficulties with BIA Begin

1978

Federal Acknowledgment Process Created in Federal Regulations | Huron Potawatomi One of the First Tribes to Seek Reaffirmation of Government-to-Government Relations/Tribal Status Under this Process

1980s

Continued Difficulties with BIA for Federal Reaffirmation

1995

Federal Reaffirmation Achieved | A Major Turning Point in Tribal History

1999 - 2018

Improvements to the Pine Creek Reservation | Government Services Expand | New Land Purchased

1999

          155-Acres Purchased by Tribe

2000

          Administration Building Constructed

2004

          Road Construction Began

2005

          First Group of Single Family, Energy Efficient Homes Constructed on

          Reservation

2006

          Tribal Court Established

2007

          79 Acres Purchased in Emmet Township and Placed in Federal Trust |

          Home of FireKeepers Casino Hotel

2008

          Pine Creek Reservation Placed into Federal Trust | 86-Acres

          Purchased Adjacent to Pine Creek Reservation

2013

          LEED Certified Government Center Constructed | Department of

          Public Works Constructed | Health Care Center Expanded and LEED

          Certified

2014

          New Athens Indian Church Constructed

2015

          Community Center and Justice Center Renovated | Memorial Park

          Completed

2009

FireKeepers Casino Opens

2011

Waséyabek Development Company, LLC (WDC) Formed

2012

FireKeepers Hotel Opens

2014

First WDC Independent Board of Directors Seated

2017

Terrapin Properties, LLC (A Subsidiary of WDC) Purchases First and Second Income Properties

2017

Waséyabek Federal Services, LLC Formed

 

Abbreviation / Acronym

Description

BAR

Branch of Acknowledgment and Research, Bureau of Indian Affairs (Evaluator of the Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi's Federal Reaffirmation Petition)

BIA

Bureau of Indian Affairs

COIA

Commissioner of Indian Affairs

HPI

Huron Potawatomi, Inc.

NHBP

Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi

WDC

Waséyabek Development Company, LLC